Dandelion - Get the Facts on Herbal Supplements

MyWikiBiz, Author Your Legacy — Tuesday September 21, 2021
Jump to navigationJump to search

MyWikiBiz

<embed>

<img src="backtop.gif" width="800" height="45" align="middle">
<a name="top">
Your search has been for:  
Dandelion site:.gov

Jump to:
<a href="#overview">Key Topics</a> || <a href="#sources">Selected Sources</a> || <a href="#advanced">Dig Deeper</a>


<a name="overview"></a><a href="#" onclick="toggle_visibility('overv'); return false;" title="Pertinent Info, most relevant to your research.">
KEY TOPICS<image src="apx4.jpg" alt="Pertinent Info, most relevant to your research."></a>

Section Contents:
<a name="top"></a>
  • Dandelion may also decrease dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, and estrone-sulfate levels.<a href="#hdng0">(More...)</a>

  • People with an inflamed or infected gallbladder, or blocked bile ducts, should avoid using dandelion.<a href="#hdng1">(More...)</a>



<a name="hdng0"></a>Dandelion may also decrease dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, androstenedione, and estrone-sulfate levels. Dandelion may increase the toxic effects when taken with supplements that lower blood pressure such as hawthorn ( Crataegus laevigata ). Toxic effects associated with herbs such as foxglove may increase when used in combination with dandelion. <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> In theory, due to chemicals called coumarins found in dandelion leaf extracts, dandelion may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Some pain relievers may also increase the risk of bleeding if used with dandelion.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment. Historically, dandelion is believed to possess diuretic (increased urination) properties and may increase the effects of other herbs with potential diuretic effects, such as artichoke, elder flower, or horsetail.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Historically, dandelion is believed to possess diuretic (increased urination) properties and to lower blood potassium levels. In theory, the effects or side effects of other drugs may be increased, including other diuretics, lithium, digoxin (Lanoxin®), or corticosteroids such as prednisone.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion may interfere with the way the liver breaks down certain drugs (using the P450 1A2 and 2E enzyme systems). The levels of these drugs may be raised in the blood, and the intended effects or side effects may be increased.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

Although effects in humans are not known, caution is advised in patients taking prescription drugs that may also lower blood sugar levels. Those using oral drugs for diabetes or insulin should be monitored closely by a healthcare professional while using dandelion.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Several laboratory studies report antioxidant properties of dandelion flower extract, although this research is preliminary, and effects in humans are not known.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Limited animal research does not provide a clear assessment of the effects of dandelion on tumor growth. There is a lack of well-conducted human studies currently available in this area.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion leaves have traditionally been used to increase urine production and excretion. Animal studies report mixed results, and there is a lack of reliable human research in this area.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Research in laboratory animals suggests that dandelion root may possess anti-inflammatory properties. There is a lack of well-conducted human studies currently available in this area.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

There is limited research on the effects of dandelion on blood sugar levels in animals.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion may increase the effects and toxicity of blood pressure-lowering agents or niacin if taken together. Dandelion may also interact with cholesterol-lowering agents, such as bile acid sequestrants.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> There is a report with several patients that suggests that a combination herbal preparation containing dandelion improved chronic pain associated with colitis. Because multiple herbs were used, and this study was not well-designed or reported, the effects of dandelion are not clear.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion is a member of the Asteraceae/Compositae family closely related to chicory. It is a perennial herb native to the Northern hemisphere and found growing wild in meadows, pastures, and waste grounds of temperate zones.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Drug interactions with dandelion have rarely been identified, although there is limited study in this area.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions. Other potential interactions with dandelion that are lacking human scientific evidence include anticancer agents, appetite suppressants, hormonal agents (such as estrogens), and laxatives. Interactions of dietary supplements with dandelion have rarely been published, although there is limited study in this area.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Although not well studied in humans, dandelion may interact with anti-inflammatory agents, antacids, analgesics, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), laxatives, nondigestible oligosaccharides (such as inulin), urine alkalinizing herbs and supplements, anticancer herbs or supplements, or other antioxidants.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion may reduce the effectiveness of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin (Cipro®) and thus may have interactions with other antibacterial herbs or supplements.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

Dandelion may reduce the effects of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin (Cipro®) due to reduced absorption of the drug.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Examples include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®), and naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®, Anaprox®). It is possible that dandelion may reduce the effectiveness of antacids or drugs commonly used to treat peptic ulcer disease.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> In traditional Arabian medicine, dandelion has been used to treat liver and spleen ailments.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), dandelion is combined with other herbs to treat liver disease, to enhance immune response to upper respiratory tract infections, bronchitis, or pneumonia, and as a compress for mastitis (breast inflammation).<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Some modern naturopathic physicians assert that dandelion can detoxify the liver and gallbladder, reduce side effects of medications metabolized (processed) by the liver, and relieve symptoms associated with liver disease.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Parasitic infection due to ingestion of contaminated dandelion has been reported, affecting the liver and bile ducts, and characterized by fever, stomach upset, vomiting, loss of appetite, coughing, and liver damage.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> The effects or side effects of niacin or nicotinic acid may be increased (such as flushing and gastrointestinal upset), due to small amounts of nicotinic acid present in dandelion.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion is generally regarded as safe with rare side effects including contact dermatitis, diarrhea, and gastrointestinal upset.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

Dandelion is used as a salad ingredient, and the roasted root and its extracts are sometimes used as a coffee substitute.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Doses of 1-2 teaspoons of a 1:5 root tincture in 45 percent alcohol have been used. There is not enough scientific research to recommend dandelion for use in children in amounts greater than those found in food.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion cannot be recommended during pregnancy and breastfeeding in amounts greater than found in foods, due to a lack of scientific information.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion may lower blood sugar levels based on one animal study, although another study notes no changes.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> In theory, dandelion may reduce the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Skin reactions have also been reported in dogs. Rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma have been reported after handling products, such as birdfeed, containing dandelion and other herbs with reported positive skin tests for dandelion hypersensitivity.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> The most common type of allergy is dermatitis (skin inflammation) after direct skin contact with dandelion, which may include itching, rash, or red/swollen or eczematous areas on the skin.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

Dandelion has been well tolerated in a small number of available human studies.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion should be avoided by individuals with known allergy to honey, chamomile, chrysanthemums, yarrow, feverfew, or any members of the Asteraceae/Compositae plant families (ragweed, sunflower, daisies).<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Ingber A. Seasonal allergic contact dermatitis from Taraxacum officinale (dandelion) in an Israeli florist.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

The levels of other herbs or supplements may become too high in the blood. In theory, dandelion may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system, such as bloodroot, grapefruit juice, or St. John's wort. Dandelion leaves contain vitamin A, niacin, lutein, and beta-carotene and thus, supplemental doses of these agents may have additive effects or side effects.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> The European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP) recommends dandelion root for the restoration of liver function, to treat upset stomach, and to treat loss of appetite.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> The German Commission E authorizes the use of combination products containing dandelion root and herb for similar illnesses.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a> Dandelion root and leaf are used widely in Europe for gastrointestinal ailments.<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank" [1]</a>

<a href="#top"><img alt="Back to Top" title="Back to Top" src="backtotop.jpg" style="border: 0px solid ; width: 72px; height: 14px;"></a>

<a name="hdng1"></a>People with an inflamed or infected gallbladder, or blocked bile ducts, should avoid using dandelion. It is important to inform your health care providers about any herb A plant or part of a plant used for its flavor, scent, or potential therapeutic properties. <a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> Includes flowers, leaves, bark, fruit, seeds, stems, and roots. or dietary supplement A product that contains vitamins, minerals, herbs or other botanicals, amino acids, enzymes, and/or other ingredients intended to supplement the diet. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has special labeling requirements for dietary supplements and treats them as foods, not drugs. you are using, including dandelion. This helps to ensure safe and coordinated care.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> The leaves and roots of the dandelion, or the whole plant, are used fresh or dried in teas, capsules, or extracts.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a>

Historically, dandelion was most commonly used to treat liver diseases, kidney diseases, and spleen problems.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> Today, dandelion is used by some as a liver or kidney "tonic," as a diuretic, and for minor digestive problems.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> Less commonly, dandelion was used to treat digestive problems and skin conditions.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> Dandelion has been used in many traditional medical systems, including Native American and traditional Arabic medicine.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a>

There is no compelling scientific evidence for using dandelion as a treatment for any medical condition.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a>

Dandelion leaves are used in salads or as a cooked green, and the flowers are used to make wine.<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank" [2]</a> A dandelion plant has a long thick tough taproot which makes it difficult to eradicate.<a href="http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/200-299/nb234.htm" TARGET="_blank" [3]</a> The dandelions, for instance, are found almost everywhere except in the tropics.<a href="http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/200-299/nb234.htm" TARGET="_blank" [3]</a>

Patients with a history of stomach problems, stomach ulcers, diabetes, or rashes to plants, especially plants in the daisy family, should probably not take dandelion.<a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank" [4]</a> From a modern perspective, some dandelion preparations seem to have weak diuretic and laxative properties. Dandelion also can have side effects such as causing an upset stomach, lowering blood sugar, and causing skin rash.<a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank" [4]</a> Dandelion is known to have medicinal properties, but it does not have any known effect on hepatitis C specifically.<a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank" [4]</a>

Dandelion was taken in the past to treat conditions including arthritis, certain cancers, gout, diabetes, and "liver problems."<a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank" [4]</a>

<a href="#top"><img alt="Back to Top" title="Back to Top" src="backtotop.jpg" style="border: 0px solid ; width: 72px; height: 14px;"></a>


<a name="sources"><a href="#" onclick="toggle_visibility('srcs'); return false;" title="Most Informative Documents, used in preparation of this report.">
SELECTED SOURCES<image src="apx4.jpg" alt="Most Informative Documents, used in preparation of this report."></a>



1. <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank">MedlinePlus Herbs and Supplements: Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)</a>
<a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html" TARGET="_blank">http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-dandelion.html</a>

2. <a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank">Dandelion [NCCAM Herbs at a Glance]</a>
<a href="http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/" TARGET="_blank">http://nccam.nih.gov/health/dandelion/</a>

3. <a href="http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/200-299/nb234.htm" TARGET="_blank">Dandelion and Chicory</a>
<a href="http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/200-299/nb234.htm" TARGET="_blank">http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/natbltn/200-299/nb234.htm</a>

4. <a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank">Alternative Therapies--Dandelion (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs)</a>
<a href="http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04" TARGET="_blank">http://www.hepatitis.va.gov/vahep?page=altmed-04-04</a>

<a href="#top"><img alt="Back to Top" title="Back to Top" src="backtotop.jpg" style="border: 0px solid ; width: 72px; height: 14px;"></a>



<a name="advanced">Try digging deeper by doing research on a
LARGER SET OF DOCUMENTS:

<form name="theForm2" action="http://iresearch-reporter.com/demo" target="_blank" method="get" ><input name="query" height="21" size="55" maxlength="2048" title="Search2" type="text" value="Dandelion site:.gov"><input alt="" name="Submit2" value="Submit" src="btn_submit.gif" title="Submit advanced request" align="center" height="21" type="image" width="77"></form>
(Will open in a new window. Your browser must have JavaScript & Cookies enabled.)



Automatically generated multi-source summary has been compiled basing on the
fair use of snippets extracted from original articles, found through the
Google web search.
<img src="backbottom.gif" width="800" height="45">
</tbody>

</embed>

MyWikiBiz

Directory:Get the Facts on Herbal Supplements


<ASK Mainlabel="Herbal Supplements" Header="show" Link="all"> Directory:Get the Facts on Herbal Supplements </ASK>